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     1   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm

1

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

   
  
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     2   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm

2

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

   
  
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     3   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm

3

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

   
  
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     4   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm

4

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

   
  
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     5   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm

5

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

   
  
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     6   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm

6

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

   
  
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     7   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm

7

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

  Black Rainbow   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm

Black Rainbow

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

1

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

2

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

3

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

4

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

5

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

6

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

7

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

Black Rainbow

With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier. Black Rainbow concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London. 

150 x 84 cm

   
  
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     1   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm
   
  
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     2   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm
   
  
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     3   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm
   
  
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     4   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm
   
  
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     5   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm
   
  
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     6   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm
   
  
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     7   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm
  Black Rainbow   With increasingly privatised cities, the use of architecture seems to have developed beyond that of simply controlling the movement of people through space. In corporate environments, environments with greater aesthetic flourishes seemingly conceal these matters, and rather, display a greater sense of luxury. Departing from conventional approaches, these spaces progressively consist of polished materials as well as undulated sculptures of all kinds. However, as such environments are built to meet the model of one community, a culture from the other end of the spectrum is also drawn in. Within business districts, skateboarders engage with their activity on a far more stimulating level in light of the disparate terrains available to them. Slanted walls can be surfed like steep waves whilst benches can be 'waxed' to grind and slide, activating greater potentials that the original architects may not have intended. Subsequently, these areas repeatedly develop popularity within this culture, and thus become the site of considerable friction between the skateboarder and land occupier.  Black Rainbow  concentrates on this conflict of territory, investigating the residue on skated surfaces within the urban landscape of London.   150 x 84 cm